Dear Moderator
If you look below the picture of the frosty Jack Nickleson you will find a post which includes a live list of the candidates requested in the sample. You should be able to click on those and be taken directly to each student's blog.
Each blog has a link back to AS Thriller Homepage which you can use to navigate back here.


ROUGH CUT DEADLINE: In your lesson w/c 14th March

Phil's Media Resources Blog

Have a look at the important links just to your right - I've added a new link to Phil's Media Resources Blog - it's got some great resources for making thrillers. When you've had a look at it blog about what's inspired you in your own blog!


PLEASE CLICK ON YOUR GROUP LINK BEFORE YOU BLOG! If you have posted on the main page below in error, pop in and see me in January.
Enjoy your Holidays!


The Shining

The Shining
You may gain inspiration from the weather and produce a 'homage to Kubrick's The Shining.

Monday, December 13, 2010

Suspense is a feeling of uncertainty and anxiety about the outcome of certain actions, most often referring to an audience's perceptions in a dramatic work. Suspense is not exclusive to fiction, though. Suspense may operate in any situation where there is a lead up to a big event or dramatic moment, with tension being a primary emotion felt as part of the situation. In the kind of suspense described by film director Alfred Hitchcock, an audience experiences suspense when they expect something bad to happen and have (or believe they have) a superior perspective on events in the drama's hierarchy of knowledge, yet they are powerless to intervene to prevent it from happening. In broader definitions of suspense, this emotion arises when someone is aware of his lack of knowledge about the development of a meaningful event; thus, suspense is a combination of anticipation and uncertainty dealing with the obscurity of the future. In terms of narrative expressions, it may be contrasted with mystery or curiosity and surprise. Suspense could however be some small event in a person's life, such as a child anticipating an answer to a request they've made, e.g., "May I get the kitty?". Therefore, suspense comes in many different sizes, big and small.

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